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Foreigners in Venice

Russians in Venice
Russians in Venice
Strolling the alleys of the city one comes across those places most visited by the most famous Russian visitors. Tchaichovsky was here and composed the Fourth Symphony, Aleksander Trubetzkoj owned the Ca' d'Oro for a while. Joseph Brodsky, essayist and poet, who wrote “Fondamenta degli Incurabili”, had his favourite cafes and restaurants, and is buried on the cemetery island of San Michele along with Stravinski and Djaghilev.
Armenians in Venice
Armenians in Venice
The Serene Republic enjoyed a close partnership with Armenia since the Middle Ages, and the history of an intense relationship through the centuries can be reviewed in visits to the church of Santa Croce, the imposing Palazzo Ca' Zenobio and finally to the island of San Lazzaro degli Armeni and its fine collection of paintings and ancient manuscripts.
The Ghetto
The Ghetto
In 1516 the government of the Republic of Venice established a place of enforced residence for Jews, thus instituting the first Ghetto in history. Their segregation served also as protection from outside attack,and the community on its little urban island flourished, building both their homes and their synagogues, still active, which may be visited.
Greeks and Dalmatians
Greeks and Dalmatians
Venice always maintained strong commercial relations with these peoples, and they have left their mark on the city in those areas where they settled; important testimony to their cultures are to be found in the Orthodox church of San Giorgio dei Greci and the Scuola di San Giorgio degli Schiavoni with its masterpieces by Vittore Carpaccio, and in various collection of Byzantine icons.